QS Best Student City Rankings

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Rankings
My Rank City QS Rank
Rankings
'Rankings' is intended to take a read of the collective performance of a city’s universities in the QS World University Rankings®. The indicators have been designed to take into account the magnetism of the large numbers universities found in large cities as well as lending recognition to the locations of the world’s elite institutions. All indicators in this category carry equal weight.
Student Mix
Student Mix is designed to look at the student make-up of the city, both overall and from an international perspective. Cities with higher proportions of students are likely to be better equipped with the facilities students need. Cities with high numbers of international students are more likely to have the facilities to welcome more.
Quality of Living
A score based on the results of the Mercer Quality of Living Survey 2011. Since Mercer only lists 50 world cities, those not listed are automatically assigned a minimum of half the available points in lieu of further data which has been requested.
Employer Activity
Domestic Employer Popularity A score based on the number of domestic employers who identified at least one institution in the city as producing excellent graduates International Employer Popularity [x2] A score based on the weighted count of international employers who identified at least one institution in the city as producing excellent graduates. Since all our work is focused on international students and opportunities for mobility, this indicator carries twice the weight of the domestic alternative.
Affordability
Tuition Fees [x2] Usually the most substantial outlay for a student, particularly for an international student, global trends suggest that tuition fees are likely to play an increasing role in shaping international student mobility trends over the next ten years. This carries twice the weight of the other two affordability indicators. Big Mac Index A score based on the well-known index of retail pricing in cities worldwide, compiled and published by the Economist Intelligence Unit. Mercer Cost of Living Index Hong Kong is a great example of why two third-party indices of affordability have been selected. In Hong Kong, property is at a premium but food is inexpensive. Hong Kong places as the world’s 9th most expensive city in the Mercer index but is the second cheapest country in the Big Mac Index. The two working together form a more appropriate read for students.
Paris 1 95 86 84 95 57
London 2 100 98 81 95 41
Singapore 3 79 83 89 100 60
Sydney 4 86 94 99 90 38
Zurich 5 78 81 99 84 62
Melbourne 5 89 100 85 90 40
Hong Kong 7 94 85 59 96 69
Boston 8 98 84 71 90 52
Montreal 9 85 91 79 71 65
Munich 10 70 72 97 72 78
Berlin 11 69 72 83 75 83
San Francisco 12 94 65 81 82 50
Toronto 13 82 82 92 61 54
Seoul 14 93 72 55 87 62
Vienna 15 45 88 100 65 68
Dublin 15 77 92 80 75 42
Tokyo 17 92 49 70 91 61
Beijing 18 88 57 55 90 69
Auckland 18 55 78 91 79 56
Copenhagen 20 78 67 89 86 35
New York 21 95 65 73 77 44
Vancouver 21 65 84 93 52 60
Chicago 23 95 61 73 68 52
Barcelona 24 70 71 68 81 57
Milan 24 55 67 70 96 59
Brisbane 26 75 92 60 73 43
Stockholm 27 65 64 88 88 33
Taipei 28 81 45 51 72 88
Manchester 29 71 92 44 67 61
Perth 30 66 93 73 56 46
Madrid 31 60 62 69 77 64
Edinburgh 32 75 96 36 69 55
Buenos Aires 33 60 64 55 83 68
Brussels 33 47 75 87 46 75
Shanghai 35 76 38 59 79 77
Amsterdam 36 64 57 94 61 40
Canberra 37 64 77 55 75 44
Los Angeles 38 70 67 55 70 47
Moscow 38 68 63 55 60 63
Adelaide 38 54 83 62 62 48
Lyon 41 54 76 50 47 77
Washington DC 42 70 62 69 49 53
Kuala Lumpur 43 48 53 55 43 100
Philadelphia 44 82 56 51 48 58
Prague 45 43 80 48 67 55
Mexico City 46 60 23 55 59 92
Helsinki 47 63 46 62 45 70
Oslo 48 52 53 67 49 63
Santiago 49 57 30 51 80 65
Kyoto 50 71 50 30 69 62