Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science - Sociology Concentration Program By Tufts University |Top Universities

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science - Sociology Concentration

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science - Sociology Concentration

Tufts University

Medford - Somerville Campus, Medford, United States
  • QS World University Rankings
    =312
  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
  • Duration 48 months
The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science is conferred on all students who complete this program. Students whose major concentration is applied mathematics, applied physics, astrophysics, biochemistry, biology, biopsychology, chemical physics, chemistry, cognitive and brain Sciences, computer science, engineering psychology, environmental studies (as second major only), geological sciences, geology, mathematics, and physics are eligible to receive a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. Those majoring in psychology, psychology/clinical and quantitative economics may choose to receive the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts at the time they complete their degree sheet. Students in all other majors will receive a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students whose multiple majors make them eligible for either a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science degree may choose between the two when completing their degree sheet. Major Requirements All Sociology majors, including those who elect to do one of the clusters, must complete ten Sociology courses. None of the ten courses may be taken pass-fail, and at least six of the courses must be listed or cross-listed by the Tufts University Department of Sociology. Six of the ten required courses must be taken at the Medford campus. Of the 10 Sociology courses required, 3 must be the following core courses, at least 2 of which must be taken in the Tufts University Department of Sociology: 01: Introduction to Sociology 100: Research Design and Interpretation* – offered in fall semesters ONLY 103: Survey of Social Theory – offered in spring semesters ONLY Of the 10 required Sociology courses, one must be a seminar numbered 180 or above. Sociology 193, 194, 197, 198 and 199 do not count for this requirement. Program Overview The Department of Sociology teaches students to examine social interactions, institutions, and identities in a systematic way. Our varied courses show how our selves, our actions, and our relationships are shaped by society, and how they in turn structure and change society. Social class, race, and gender are of central concern, as are institutions such as the media, the law, the family, religion, medicine, education, the military, business, nonprofit organizations, science, and the arts. Our research and teaching strengths are in three broad areas: media, culture, and society; social inequalities and social change; and immigration, transnational communities, and globalization. Learning Objectives Students who graduate with a major in Sociology will have developed: A broad understanding of the historical and theoretical development of the discipline; An understanding of how to gather and analyze quantitative data; The skills to develop an original research question, design a project using qualitative data to study the question, and gather and analyze qualitative data to answer the question. An in-depth understanding of classical and contemporary sociological theories; The ability to examine social structures analytically and critically; an understanding of how social constructs such as gender, race, and class influence people's social positions and organize their daily lives; Knowledge of how people change society by forming social movements and using the media; A comparative perspective on cultures, social structures, institutions,