Bachelors of Arts in Astronomy Program By Cornell University |Top Universities

Bachelors of Arts in Astronomy

Bachelors of Arts in Astronomy

  • QS World University Rankings
    21
  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors

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Cornell’s Astronomy faculty, research staff, graduate, and undergraduate students are active in diverse areas of modern astronomy ranging from theoretical astrophysics and general relativity to the study of exoplanets, pulsars, star formation, galaxy formation and evolution, cosmology, and the exploration of the solar system. Cornell and the California Institute of Technology are leading an international consortium in a design study for a large sub millimeter telescope, CCAT, in the high Atacama desert in Chile. Several members of the department faculty are also principal investigators on major NASA space and planetary exploration missions. The department offers a number of courses to satisfy a general interest in astronomy. These courses have few or no prerequisites and are not intended for the training of professional astronomers. Among the introductory courses, several choices are available, depending on background and on the requirements to be fulfilled. The 1000-level courses are designed primarily for nonscience majors. The alternative introductory sequence ASTRO 2211-ASTRO 2212 is geared toward sophomore physical science and engineering majors and requires co-registration in beginning calculus. ASTRO 2201 and ASTRO 2202 are intended for students with an interest in astronomy but no scientific background; they are topical rather than survey-oriented. ASTRO 3301, ASTRO 3302 and ASTRO 3303 are designed for physical science and engineering majors as an introduction to core topics in astrophysics. Other courses at the 2000- and 3000-levels may appeal to students of various backgrounds and interests, as indicated in the individual course descriptions. Courses numbered above 4000 are intended for students who have had two to three years of college physics and at least two years of college mathematics. ASTRO 4940 - Independent Study in Astronomy permits students to engage in individual research projects under the guidance of a faculty member. Interested students are encouraged to become members of the undergraduate Cornell Astronomy Club. The club has access to the Fuertes Observatory on campus and conducts regular observing and astrophotography sessions. All students are invited to visit the Space Sciences Building, see the exhibits on display there, and consult faculty members about career plans or choice of courses.