Bachelor of Arts in History - Secondary Education Emphasis Program By Missouri University of Science and Technology |Top Universities

Bachelor of Arts in History - Secondary Education Emphasis

Bachelor of Arts in History - Secondary Education Emphasis

  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
Students who study history are educated to analyze trends and events, to write and speak intelligently about the lessons of our shared past, and to ultimately teach all of us the value in challenging what we know and accept as truth. History professionals are masters of critical thinking and evaluating the ideas and principles that shape the human experience. History is the study and analysis of the events of the past to discover the roots of humanity, where we have been, and where we are bound to go again. Where do historians work: With a degree in history, you can use the lessons of the past to consult businesses on future endeavors, analyze current market trends, give advice about foreign relations, research fascinating eras, or become a lobbyist. Historians become museum curators, archivists, teachers, and librarians. Today’s historians are branching out to become lawyers, producers, editors, and government leaders. History is a response to the eternal desire of human beings to know more about themselves. For this reason, history students experience a variety of courses, which emphasize the importance of people, their individual choices, their values and their ways of seeing themselves and their world. History majors study man’s accumulated heritage from the fossil past to the nuclear present. This varied course of study includes fundamental survey classes, specific chronological or topical investigations, and special topic seminars. At Missouri S&T individuals who hold Ph.D. degrees and are publishing scholars teach virtually all of your history and political science courses. The hallmark of the program is individual attention. In upper-level courses, efforts are made to keep class sizes small enough to enable discussion, which in turn provides for a greater breadth of knowledge and depth of understanding, and for personal student-professor associations. As a history major you learn to analyze information, communicate effectively, and engage in research. Such skills are useful for careers in government service, business, industry, and social service institutions, as well as being the fundamental requisites for graduate and professional studies beyond the undergraduate degree.