Bachelor of Science in Physics Program By Missouri University of Science and Technology |Top Universities

Bachelor of Science in Physics

Bachelor of Science in Physics

  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
  • Duration 48 months
Physics is the study and application of the basic physical laws that govern our universe. As one of the oldest academic disciplines, physics gave rise to modern science and technology as we know it. Today, physicists use cutting edge technology to understand physical phenomena in the world around us. Some physicists become astronauts, develop materials for superconductors and high powered lasers, optimize the acoustics for concerts, research exciting opportunities in nano-technology, develop new “green” energy sources, or study the physics of the human body. Where do physicists work: Graduates in physics can use their foundation of critical thinking and applied logic in many chosen careers. Physicists take positions at universities, join information technology companies, and thrive in pharmaceutical and medical research corporations. Physics is devoted to the discovery and exploration of the most basic physical laws governing our material universe. The working physicist attempts to express these laws in their most elegant mathematical form, so that they can be applied to predict the behavior of all forms of matter and energy, in physical systems that range from the subatomic level of quarks, gluons, nuclei, and atoms, all the way out to the astrophysical level of planets, stars, black holes, galaxies, and larger scale structures of the universe. The knowledge obtained in various experimental and theoretical investigations of physical phenomena forms the foundation for many modern technologies. For example there are lasers used in high-speed communications and micro-surgery, the plastic electronics used in modern computer displays, the magnetic behavior of the thin films used for computer hard drives, and the radiation detectors and optical elements used in the Hubble space telescope. The fundamental knowledge gained by physicists helps to shape and improve the quality of modern life. The Missouri S&T physics department is dedicated to providing opportunities for undergraduates to participate in cutting-edge, nationally funded scientific research programs supervised by departmental faculty. Topics currently being investigated by Missouri S&T undergraduates include collisions between electrons, atoms, and ions; the magnetic properties of nanoscale thin films and other highly magnetic materials; transparent conducting oxides; photonic materials; quantum phase transitions; and atmospheric changes induced by manmade pollutants, such as those found in acid rain or in the exhaust generated by high altitude aircraft and space vehicle launches. Many physics majors choose to use their electives to study other technical areas, such as mathematics, computer science, or electrical engineering. Some students get dual bachelor’s degrees, for example, with their second degree in computer science, chemistry, or mathematics. Because there is considerable overlap in degree requirements between physics and other technical and scientific disciplines, a dual degree usually requires no more than one extra semester of undergraduate study. The best curriculum for each student seeking a dual degree is determined in planning sessions with his or her advisor. An undergraduate degree in physics provides opportunities for a wide range of careers. About two- thirds of our graduates go on to graduate school, many at some of the most prestigious first-tier schools in the country. In addition many of those who complete their physics education with a bachelor’s degree have been very successful in finding exciting employment opportunities in today’s high-tech industries. Missouri S&T physics graduates have gone on to lead and manage major research efforts at leading industrial companies, to be professors and chairmen at leading academic universities, and to work in areas ranging from law and medicine to ecophysics and astrophysics.