Master of Landscape Architecture Program By University of Oregon |Top Universities

Master of Landscape Architecture

Master of Landscape Architecture

  • QS World University Rankings
    651-700
First Professional: Students entering with a four-year or non accredited degree in landscape architecture spend two to three years completing the first professional MLA. The first year focuses on course work required for the degree. The second year focuses on completing electives related to the master’s project and the project or thesis itself. Students who have no background in landscape design and planning can expect to spend a minimum of ten terms earning an accredited, first professional MLA. The department recognizes that first professional master’s candidates have extremely varied backgrounds and may have special requirements. Post professional: The two-year graduate program leading to the master of landscape architecture (MLA) degree is intended for students prepared to do advanced work in the field. Students entering the Post professional MLA program must have a professionally accredited bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture or architecture. Students with professional architecture degrees may spend an additional term, decided on a case-by-case basis. A central aspect of the Post professional MLA program is the student’s concentration on studies and original work in one of five areas of landscape architecture: design theory, landscape ecology, landscape history, urban design, and landscape planning. These areas are broad enough to include many particular research problems for master’s projects and professional practice. While these concentration areas are naturally related, each involves a different set of skills and understanding developed through departmental courses and focused elective course work outside the department. The five concentration areas are those in which faculty members, due to their academic training and professional and research experience, are best equipped for collaboration with graduate students. Concentration Areas - Design Theory: The transformation and enhancement of outdoor environments to more beautiful, expressive, and supportive places involves developing creative artistry, applying an understanding of places and their evolutionary possibilities, and thinking clearly with sensitivity to peoples’ needs and values. This concentration is intensive in design criticism and in theories of design process, ideas, and content. Landscape Ecology: This rapidly evolving discipline focuses on how landscape pattern, process, and change interact to create land mosaics that maintain the rich diversity of life and the foundations for human well-being. Understanding key links between spatial and temporal patterns and flows of organisms, materials, energy, and information at a variety of scales is the basis for maintaining or restoring landscapes that embody ecological integrity and cultural vitality. Landscape History: This dimension of landscape architecture seeks to understand every landscape as a unique place in time and content. It combines an understanding of how landscapes have evolved as cultural and vernacular environments as well as how they have evolved as deliberate expressions of social norms and cultural aesthetics through history and among cultures. These understandings are applied to theories of design and planning as well as to the preservation of culturally rich landscapes. Landscape Planning: Analyzing large landscapes and directing their management and land-use patterns to meet social and environmental ends requires an understanding of land tenure, use traditions and institutions, and knowledge of the science and values inherent in regional natural resources and human activities. Urban Design: Many projects undertaken by the profession entail study of the form and function of cities at many scales to design and integrate systems of transportation, recreation, infrastructure, nature conservation, and buildings.