Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature Program By University of Oregon |Top Universities

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature

  • QS World University Rankings
    651-700
  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
The undergraduate program offers a unique major that cuts across disciplines, teaches critical skills, and provides an intellectually challenging curriculum while preparing students for possible careers in the media, law, government, business, or teaching. Students with a good background in one or more languages other than English find that the program gives them the opportunity to study literature and related cultural productions, including canonical and emerging writings, in a variety of historical and theoretical perspectives. The program combines maximum flexibility with a rigorous grounding in the basics of literary theory and cultural studies. Based on their interests, majors choose one of two emphases: language and culture or disciplines in dialogue. In the first, students develop proficiency in two national-linguistic traditions. In the second, students explore links between a single national-linguistic tradition and a non-literary field. Comparative literature majors must complete at least one year of upper-division training in a language other than English. For students working in French, German, Italian, or Spanish, a third year entails the study of literature. Appropriate courses include, for example, French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance (FR 317), French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment (FR 318), French Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries (FR 319) or Introduction to German Culture and Society (GER 340), Introduction to German Culture and Society (GER 341) as well as any 400-level literature course taught in the language in question. For students working in Chinese, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, Japanese, Russian, or Swedish, the third year will typically entail further training in grammar and oral production. Appropriate courses include, for example, Third-Year Chinese (CHN 301), Third-Year Chinese (CHN 302), Third-Year Chinese (CHN 303), the Judaic studies sequence taught in Hebrew, Biblical Narrative (HBRW 311), Biblical Poetry (HBRW 312), Post biblical Literature (HBRW 313), or Third-Year Russian (RUSS 316), Third-Year Russian (RUSS 317), Third-Year Russian (RUSS 318). With the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, courses taken abroad may be used to fulfill this requirement. Emphases within the Major: Because there are many different ways of thinking about literature from a comparative perspective, two emphases within the major are offered. One emphasis, language and culture, features comparative study across different national-linguistic traditions. This emphasis is recommended for students who want to study abroad, attend graduate school in comparative literature, or want to gain an in-depth understanding of one or more foreign cultures. A second emphasis, disciplines in dialogue, allows students to combine literary study with work in a non-literary discipline. This emphasis offers an alternative for students considering a double major in literature and a non-literary field. It is also well-suited to students who want to combine literary study with creative writing, performance, or the visual arts. Language and Culture Emphasis: Students in this emphasis designate two national-linguistic traditions (e.g., Spanish and German; English and Japanese; French and Russian). In addition, the language chosen to fulfill the foreign language requirement should coincide with one of these national-linguistic traditions. Disciplines in Dialogue Emphasis: Students in this emphasis designate one national-linguistic tradition and one other disciplinary focus (e.g., creative writing, philosophy, cinema studies, psychology, art history). Courses taken in this disciplinary focus may be spread out across several subject codes, with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Students are strongly advised to complete their foreign language requirement in a language relevant either to their national-linguistic tradition or to their disciplinary focus.