Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science - Peace and Justice Studies Concentration Program By Tufts University |Top Universities

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science - Peace and Justice Studies Concentration

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science - Peace and Justice Studies Concentration

Tufts University

Medford - Somerville Campus, Medford, United States
  • QS World University Rankings
    =312
  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
  • Duration 48 months
The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science is conferred on all students who complete this program. Students whose major concentration is applied mathematics, applied physics, astrophysics, biochemistry, biology, biopsychology, chemical physics, chemistry, cognitive and brain Sciences, computer science, engineering psychology, environmental studies (as second major only), geological sciences, geology, mathematics, and physics are eligible to receive a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree. Those majoring in psychology, psychology/clinical and quantitative economics may choose to receive the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts at the time they complete their degree sheet. Students in all other majors will receive a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students whose multiple majors make them eligible for either a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science degree may choose between the two when completing their degree sheet. Our world faces a set of interrelated problems, including militarism and war, political violence and repression, ecological destruction, poverty, hunger, racism, and institutionalized sexism. Throughout the world, international, inter-governmental, and local nongovernmental organizations have formed to confront such problems and to work for nonviolent social change. Upon completion of the PJS major requirements students will be able to: Demonstrate broad knowledge of the historical, theoretical and interdisciplinary development of the field. Learning Objectives Define basic concepts in peace studies, including positive and negative peace; structural violence, cultural violence, nonviolence, mediation, negotiation, and arbitration. Define basic concepts in justice studies, including transitional justice, environmental justice, distributional justice, procedural justice, and accountability. Define basic concepts in human rights and describe their history. Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between peace and justice. Demonstrate an understanding of the different perspectives on conflict, including social, psychological, cultural, political, economic, environmental, religious, and historical. Demonstrate an understanding of the causes of violence, including direct, structural, and cultural dimensions. Demonstrate familiarity with the techniques of conflict resolution. Demonstrate an ability to identify and analyze normative questions. Demonstrate a capacity for assessing and evaluating competing points of view. Identify and explain how people and groups act to promote peace and justice, including: the principled and pragmatic approaches to nonviolent action and the wide array of methods deployed; the dynamics and strategic interactions of contentious politics; and the social innovations in diverse forms and arenas of leadership, whether in civil society, institutions of governance, or political economy. Develop strategies for nonviolent action on behalf of justice and peace, whether by community organizing, advocacy, movement mobilization, or deliberative civic engagement. Demonstrate experiential learning skills for integrating coursework with internship and/or field research opportunities. Demonstrate the ability to produce an integrative capstone product based on research (quantitative or qualitative) and/or civic engagement.