Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) with a Major in Civil Engineering - Structural Engineering and Mechanics Program By Duke University |Top Universities

Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) with a Major in Civil Engineering - Structural Engineering and Mechanics

Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) with a Major in Civil Engineering - Structural Engineering and Mechanics

  • QS World University Rankings
    52
  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
  • Duration 48 months

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The bachelor of science with a major in civil engineering (CE) features two study tracks so students can pursue interests in either (or both) structural engineering and mechanics (S/M), or environmental engineering and water resources (E/W). This major will be of interest to students interested in, in part, the design and construction of civil infrastructure. Students have considerable flexibility to pursue second majors and minors within the Pratt School of Engineering or Duke's Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. The application of solid mechanics and materials science to the design of building systems and transportation systems to carry static loads and to resist dynamic loads. Beyond the education provided by these undergraduate courses, students may pursue independent study in areas of Structural Engineering and Mechanics on which Duke places particular emphasis, including: Computational Mechanics The study of how to efficiently and accurately simulate the response of complex materials and structures to a broad range of loading conditions. Computer simulations of structures undergoing cracking and yielding with large deformation are addressed by faculty in the department. Environmental Mechanics The study of how extreme heat, aggressive chemical environments, and high mechanical loads affect the load-carrying capacity of solids, structures and soils. Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering The study of how earthquake-induced ground motions affect building and bridge structures, the design of such structures to resist earthquake loading, and the control of structures by using 'smart' materials to improve their dynamic response to earthquake loads.