BS in Computer Science and Information Science Program By Northeastern University |Top Universities

BS in Computer Science and Information Science

BS in Computer Science and Information Science

  • QS World University Rankings
    342
  • Degree BS
  • Study Level Bachelors
The Computer Science and Information Science combined major is designed for students looking for a thorough immersion in both fields. You’ll focus on the fundamentals and theories of computing plus the management of information-while taking all required courses for the Computer Science and Information Science undergraduate degree programs. Learning outcomes - Computer science: Understand the intellectual foundations for the design of software programs and for the design of algorithms and data structures within programs and larger systems. Be able to apply these principles in the creation of software systems. Understand in-depth the three fundamental programming paradigms: functional, imperative, and object-oriented. Know when and how to apply these paradigms singly and in combination to build efficient, maintainable systems. Be aware that other more specialized paradigms exist such as declarative and logic-based. Understand the basics of event-driven programming. Be able to apply this model to create human computer interfaces or to handle asynchronous data that arrives from external sources. Develop skills in problem analysis and problem solving, especially in the context of the high complexity of the computing world. Be prepared to apply known design patterns in a setting of multiple constraints. Be able to invent new approaches by systematic experimentation. Be able to predict the performance of planned systems by use of the techniques of algorithm analysis. Understand that the computing world is networked and that software is almost always running in an interconnected manner on multiple machines throughout the network. Be able to take advantage of network access and at the same time be aware of security risks and know how to mitigate these risks. Possess some knowledge of the major software technologies: programming languages, operating systems, network systems and the web, database management systems, artificial intelligence, graphics systems, human computer interfaces, and intelligent systems. Know some systems in sufficient depth to be able to design and implement software using these systems. Show respect for the diversity of all individuals in the computing/information field in all its settings: academia, research, industry, business, health care, government. Understand that people have different backgrounds and experiences that provide varied and useful perspectives on problem solving and design. Possess skills in writing, reading, and speaking because communication within organizations and to the public is essential. Acquire the mathematical foundations appropriate to the degree program that is chosen by the student. Be able to use mathematics during the design and analysis of systems. Information Science: Understand and be able to carry out the steps in the design of information systems for organizations: planning, analysis, design, project management, and implementation. Understand the tradeoffs between traditional development models and more agile techniques. Be able to choose a development model and be able to complete a project using that model. Understand and be able to program traditional SQL-based relational database systems. Be aware of modern trends in the design of large scale storage systems. Understand standard text-based techniques for small-scale data storage. Understand human computer interaction from multiple perspectives: the psychology of the user, the needs of the organization, and the technical issues of implementation. Be able to weigh issues of ease of use against concerns for security. Be able to apply statistical techniques to perform research on systems about to be deployed or already in the field. Know how to collect and analyze data about the end user experience and data about system performance and throughput.