Bachelor of Science in Geoscience - Paleontology Concentration Program By Drexel University |Top Universities

Bachelor of Science in Geoscience - Paleontology Concentration

Bachelor of Science in Geoscience - Paleontology Concentration

  • QS World University Rankings
    651-700
  • Degree Other
  • Study Level Bachelors
  • Duration 60 months
Over the past few decades, climate change and other pressing environmental issues have brought to light the necessity for understanding Earth system processes. The study of the Earth is central to maintaining clean drinking water, mitigating environmental contamination, providing ores and rare elements necessary for industry, and locating new sources of energy. Predicting sea level change; discovering new geothermal, hydrocarbon, and mineral stores of energy; removing buried toxins from the environment-these and other imperatives are the work of geoscientists. Understanding the 99.99% of our history that precedes the archaeological record, the humbling contingencies of natural history, and the vast swaths and depths of biodiversity over time-that is the work of geoscientists. Graduates of Drexel’s BS in Geoscience will be among the next generation of leading scientists tackling these critical issues. The Paleontology concentration builds on existing strengths at Drexel University and at the Academy of Natural Sciences. Paleontology students will benefit from world-class resources, including the invertebrate paleontology collection (over 1 million specimens); the vertebrate fossil collection (22,000 specimens); historically important specimens, such as the Thomas Jefferson fossil collection, the first-discovered dinosaur skeleton, and the first-discovered tyrannosaur; and the pale botany collection (over 5,000 specimens). Many other Academy collections, such as mollusks, rotifers, and diatoms, will provide relevant resources for students of paleontology. In addition, the Lacovara lab on Drexel’s campus houses several thousand specimens and contains a relatively complete collection of known taxa from the Cretaceous of New Jersey. Fossil Dig Sites Students in the Paleontology concentration will have access to numerous fossil sites along the Atlantic Coastal Plain and in the Appalachian Province. Opportunities exist for student research at the well-established sites of two prominent Drexel paleontologists: Ted Daeschler’s Red Hill site, which produces evolutionarily important forms representing the fish to tetra pod transition; and Ken Lacovara’s the Inver sand site, which records a mass-death assemblage at the end of the Cretaceous Period. Careers The Paleontology concentration will prepare students who are interested in pursuing related research in graduate school and students seeking entry-level positions in paleontology. Examples of these jobs include biostratigrapher for petroleum companies, fossil resource manager for the Bureau of Land Management, and related positions with the National Parks Service, USGS, and state geological surveys. However, the strength of the Geosciences core will allow students wishing to tack in a different direction to seek employment in the environmental consulting field or to pursue other areas of advanced study in the geosciences.