Master of Science in Computer Science Program By University of Kentucky |Top Universities

Master of Science in Computer Science

Master of Science in Computer Science

+ 2 others shortlisted this program

+ 3 others shortlisted this program

The Department of Computer Science offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science (MS) in Computer Science. Admission to these programs is highly competitive and based upon academic record, GRE scores, resume, professional experience, statement of purpose, and letters of recommendation. Applicants should present evidence of competence in computer science as well as of mathematical maturity. Since very few specific courses are required for the graduate degree programs, all degree candidates in the MS program must demonstrate proficiency in the fundamental areas of computer science by taking four core courses, see Section 3.A below. Thesis (Plan A) and non-thesis (Plan B) options are available in the program leading to the MS degree. A project is required of non-thesis candidates. The program has no language requirement (other than proficiency in English). Student Outcomes The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science program is designed to enable students to achieve the following by the time they graduate: (a) An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline; (b) An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution; (c ) An ability to design, implement and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs; (d) An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal; (e) An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities; (f) An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences; (g) An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations and society; (h) Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, continuing professional development; (i) An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practices; (j) An ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices; (k) An ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity.